Connect with us

Philadelphia Eagles

Missed Opportunities: Week 7

Avatar

Published

on

Hey-a, gang!

I figured I’d start a little film review segment for y’all: I’m going to break down three plays on which Philadelphia coulda, shoulda, woulda seen a positive outcome, but didn’t. We know that many little factors can impact the execution of a concept, block, release, or likewise–we’ll also look into those, and how they may continue to show up moving forward.

Our first play is a red zone attempt that really glared in my live watch. If not for the magical touchdown throw to RB Corey Clement that followed on 3rd and goal, I certainly would have come down a little harder on QB Carson Wentz for significantly missing WR Alshon Jeffery on this corner route in the back of the end zone.

Once Carson identifies man coverage with a single high safety, he steps up for the audible. Alshon Jeffery, a dangerous red zone target, is lined up in the slot–that’s definitely a matchup I like. Carson audibles to the Double China concept: “China,” because a square in is run underneath a corner route; “Double” because there are two square ins.

This concept is built to create a big void in the back of the end zone, while also forcing the slot CB to work away from his help (the single-high) safety. On the podcast, we’ve spent more than a little time discussing Alshon’s recent struggles and poor numbers, but credit him for separating effectively here.

Carson has always put the ball a little high–an issue that is especially exacerbated in the red zone, wherein it is encouraged that QBs put the ball a little higher (overthrows are far less likely to be intercepted in the end zone, because the playing field ends). That being said, Carson gets his feet stuck in the mud, fails to really bring his weight through the throw, and it sails on him. Sure, the Clement TD heroics were awesome–but Wentz would like this ball back for sure

Our next play, regrettably, highlights some of the struggles that Big OT Halapoulivaati Vaitai had in relief work of injured superhero OT Jason Peters.

“You shouldn’t even be running LeGarrette Blount outside,” the haters cry.

Well, Philadelphia has a distinct advantage on this weakside zone run. Outside of the screen, to the offense’s left, Alshon Jeffery is matched up 1-on-1 with a corner. You can see the single-high safety (#35) roaming at the bottom of the screen. So, if C Jason Kelce, LG Stefen Wisniewski, and LT Halapoulivaati Vaitai can account for the three defenders in the box (DT #90, LB #53, and EDGE #58), then Blount will be matched up with a safety (#35) in space.

That’s ideal, folks.

For this to work, however, the toughest block is on Kelce. Watch him get all the way over and reach block that DT (#90). #90 is playing a 2i-technique–shaded just inside of the guard–yet Kelce still explodes off the line, gets his hips around him, latches, and finishes. that’s an incredible block, and it could have sprung this play open.

If Vaitai had not entirely whiffed on his zone block, that is. EDGE #58 does well to shoot inside and disrupt, but you can see the balance issues on Vaitai here. With a massive lean forward, he’s entirely out of position to reset and respond to the sudden lateral movement of the defender. He must continue developing his ability to play with his weight over his hips and ankles, so that he can get a chip on the gap-shooting defender in the future, and spring Blount for a big game.

Finally, we have this sick little passing concept, courtesy of offensive wizard Doug Pederson.

This is a “Switch” concept, and it’s just masterfully designed. Washington spent a lot of the game playing straight man coverage, especially when Philly lined up 3 WRs to one side (see the first clip). In the second quarter, Pederson dials up this little number: the “Switch” refers to the fact that #1 and #3 WRs will swap areas of the field, essentially. It creates that little rub that you see so often–a natural pick that facilitates man separation.

Now the single high safety is in a bind. He stays in centerfield, preventing Carson from hitting the sluggo route (#1 WR route)–but, in doing so, he leaves the slot receiver running down the boundary, with a step on his CB, without safety help.

And, to heap it all on, TE Zach Ertz is crossing in on a dig from the weakside, to make this a full three-level concept. *Italian chef finger kiss*

Problem is, RT Lane Johnson gets petrified by a Washington blitz. Johnson expect the EDGE defender to his side (#91) to come rushing, but he drops into coverage on RB Wendell Smallwood. While Johnson is occupied, the blitzing LB takes the free alley. Carson tries to avoid, but can’t, and this long-developing route concept falls fruitless.

In the future, if Lane can recognize and make this block, Philly’s gonna hit on this play. It’s a good one.

Ben Solak has been a football fan and film junkie for all of his life, and has the pleasure of serving as a National Scout for NDT Scouting. He also covers the Philadelphia Eagles for Bleeding Green Nation and co-hosts the Locked On Eagles podcast. Ben takes many things far too seriously, including fishing, Captain America, grammar, and Game Of Thrones.

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Philadelphia Eagles

Matchups to watch in Cleveland

Louie DiBiase

Published

on

© Eric Hartline-USA TODAY Sports

On today’s Locked On Eagles:

A look at the key matchups for Sunday’s matchup with the Cleveland Browns.

How will the Eagles defend the Nick Chubb-Kareem Hunt backfield?

Is this the game Doug Pederson and Carson Wentz finally get things right?

Continue Reading

Philadelphia Eagles

Wentz Wednesday: Week 11

Louie DiBiase

Published

on

Credit: Vincent Carchietta-USA TODAY Sports

On today’s Locked On Eagles:

Carson Wentz went from looking like Jameis Winston all year to Sam Bradford on Sunday

Evaluating the inconsistencies in Wentz’s throwing mechanics that were apparent against New York

Wentz deserves blame without always steering the attention to Doug Pederson and Howie Roseman

Continue Reading

Philadelphia Eagles

Doug and Howie on the hot seat?

Louie DiBiase

Published

on

Credit: Bill Streicher-USA TODAY Sports

On today’s Locked On Eagles:

Even in a first place position…..it is time to think big picture with the Eagles

Are Doug Pederson and Howie Roseman safe beyond 2020?

Should Jeffery Lurie continue to be patient or is a shake-up needed?

Continue Reading

Trending